ilanarama: my footies in my finnies (snorkeling)
2017-03-04 09:23 am
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tiny update

You might be wondering if I've dropped off the face of the earth, since I haven't posted since October! The truth is that when I went on vacations I wanted to post about, I was too busy to compose posts, and running has not been worthy of being posted about because I've been sick most of the winter and am only now beginning to get out again (even though I'm still not completely well).

Vacations were a week in the BVI on a sailboat charter with friends over Thanksgiving, plus a few days of land-based tourism there and in San Juan, PR on each end; and a long weekend over Christmas in Santa Fe, eating delicious food and visiting museums.

As far as the running goes, I dithered on signing up for the Canyonlands Half in March before the price went up in February, but ultimately decided I didn't have enough base to get in the shape I wanted to be for it. Turned out to be a good decision as I came down with a respiratory thing the first week of February and am still fighting it. I did register for the Steamworks Half which is in June; hopefully I will be back on form by then!

Being sick most of February also meant that my skiing ground to a halt, but I finally got out yesterday for a glorious bluebird day which reminded me of how nice it feels to twist one's body around and work with gravity to glide across the snow. Looking forward to our next storm!
ilanarama: a mountain (mountain)
2016-07-13 01:49 pm
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In which we go to Moab the hard way

Moab, in Utah, isn't very far away from Durango. We go there three or four times a year, for the Canyonlands running races in March and October, for the nearby backpacking when our mountains are too snow-covered for access, and for the world-class mountain biking. It takes a bit less than three hours to get there by car; how much less depends on your willingness to exceed the speed limit, and your need for gas and bathroom stops.

Or you can bike there in seven arduous days, over 215 miles of secondary roads, jeep roads, and trails, up mountains and across desert valleys along the route set up by San Juan Huts. (Here is a map Britt put together, showing the route - click "->7.5' Topo Maps" and zoom in to see it more clearly.)

Want to guess what we did? Yeah. Strenuous climbs, scary descents, rain, heat, mud, and mosquitoes - also killer views, deserted roads, and cold beers enjoyed with good friends. I call it a win.

Riding toward Geyser Pass

Day by day trip report, with lots of photos )

All the photos (119!), none of the blahblah

Advice I'd give to anyone contemplating this trip )
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2016-02-03 06:32 pm
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Tucson micro-vacation

We went down to Tucson late last week, as my husband's company was holding board meetings on Thursday and Friday at the fancy Loews Ventana Canyon Resort. The plan was for me to work from the hotel room during his meetings, and then we would have a micro-vacation over the weekend.

On Thursday I got miserably sick (maybe the delicious food at the fancy resort restaurant had issues? It tasted good, anyway!) but by Saturday I was ready to vacation. We drove our rental car (a Ford C-Max hybrid, which we both liked very much!) to Kartchner Caverns State Park and took a tour of the Big Room. These caves were kept secret after their discovery in the 1970s, so when they were finally developed after the land was purchased for a state park, the formations were in nearly pristine condition, unlike most tourist caves (even in National Parks!) where casual use over the years has destroyed a lot of the delicate ecology. Development was undertaken with extreme caution, so that now the caves remain in exceptional condition; we've taken quite a few cave tours over the years and were very impressed! No photos allowed, but the website has a video tour.

Afterward we went to the Pima Air and Space Museum which is the largest privately-funded aerospace museum, with over 300 aircraft of various vintages. We took the (free with admission) "Highlights of Aviation" and "World War II" walking tours, and lucked out with an amazing docent, Don McLean (no kidding!) who told us many more stories than were on the placards in front of the planes.

Sunday (all of it) was spent hiking the Ventana Canyon trail to The Window, 6.4 miles and 4260 feet each way. Britt had gone to school at the University of Arizona here many years ago and had fond memories of this hike - I figured it must be good if he still remembered it after 40 years. It was pretty cool: we started out in Sonoran desert, with saguaros all around, and by the end - a natural arch in the rock - we were hiking through the snow among pines!

IMG_20160131_142321

We should have got going earlier than our 9 am start, though, as we ended up hiking out the last half hour in the dark. Still, it was a great hike, and I definitely felt it the next day. The best of our crappy cellphone photos are on Flickr: Ventana Canyon.
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2015-12-09 05:19 pm

Canadian vacation 2015

Only four months late! ;-) You can either click on the links below or use the tag (canadian vacation 2015), or if you just want to look at the photos, the mosaic below links to the collection of albums (one for each park, plus an "on the way" album) on Flickr. Each of the individual trip reports has about 2/3 of the photos inline, and a link to the album on Flickr if you want to see the rest.



On the way to Canada
Kootenay National Park
Lake Louise
Icefields Parkway
Yoho National Park
Waterton Lakes National Park

Whew! When's my next vacation?
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2015-11-22 04:41 pm
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*taps mic*

I, um, haven't posted for two months. How did that happen?

Just a quick update on things. My back issues have continued to bother me, so a few weeks ago I got a second MRI. It showed that my herniated disk is in fact healing just fine, so my spine doc suggested another injection in a different spot, which seems to have helped a lot though not entirely banished the pain. But things are definitely improving. Next step will be a massage therapist who specializes in recovery and rehab.

I've been running a pretty solid 30-35mpw and have recently stepped it up to 40-ish. We're supposed to have an El Niño-fueled snowy winter, so I will be happy if I can maintain that throughout the winter - supplemented with skiing, of course! We have weekday passes to Purgatory, as usual, and I hope to do a lot of skiing this year. Britt's company is sponsoring a weekend at Telluride in early December, and I'm excited about that as I've never skied there before. And I hope to get the older of my two brothers, who lives in California, out here for some skiing this winter.

Britt and I will be running the local Turkey Trot on Thursday morning, which is a five-mile mixed trail and road race. It's not a competitive race in the sense that the only prizes are supermarket pumpkin pies for the top man and woman finisher, but after the race there are always incredible random draw prizes. I've won hiking socks, a pound of coffee from a local roaster, and a $50 gift certificate to a really nice restaurant in previous years.

But my next real race won't be until March. I hope to run the Canyonlands Half again, though I don't hold out hope for any great time. If I can improve over the summer I might target some fall races as goals.

After a long hiatus I have been updating my Canadian vacation reports. Four sections are done, two to go!

Speaking of vacations, Britt had a couple of meetings in California and so I flew out to Palm Springs after the first of them. We spent the weekend in Palm Springs, hiking up Mt. San Jacinto on Saturday and visiting the Living Desert museum on Sunday, and then he attended his conference at the hotel and I worked from the hotel room and wandered around the resort. It was fun! And I've booked our next major vacation, a trip to New York City timed to coincide with our (gulp) 25th anniversary. We'll be seeing Hamilton (YAY!) and Book of Mormon, doing a little museum-ing, and then flying down to visit with my aged parents in Maryland for a few days before flying back home.

So, uh, hi, Dreamwidth! Long time no see! I will try not to be a stranger! (Well, not any stranger than usual...)
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2015-08-10 03:03 pm

Canadian vacation: Waterton Lakes National Park

We came out of Yoho NP just to the north of where we'd gone in to Kootenay NP a couple of weeks ago, so we drove by the same lakes and mountains we'd seen on the way in. But when we got to the intersection where we had come in to Canada on Rt. 93, instead of continuing south we turned northeast. We drove through Fernie, which looked like a great little ski town - kind of like Durango! - and we would have liked to have spent more time there, but we could see the end of our vacation looming in the distance and needed to keep moving. We camped at Crowsnest Pass between British Columbia and Alberta, which was beautiful, though ridiculously windy. Again, we drove by lots of interesting historic towns, but made the decision to maximize our time at Waterton Lakes NP.

The interesting thing about Waterton Lakes is that it's right at the juncture between the Alberta prairie and the mountains, thanks to the Lewis Thrust Fault. It makes for a very cool contrast as there are high mountains in one direction and plains in the other. And in the middle there are great big beautiful lakes!

View of Upper Waterton Lake

Read more... )

More photos, fewer words at Flickr.
ilanarama: a mountain (mountain)
2015-08-05 11:49 am

Canadian vacation: Yoho National Park

On the morning of August 3rd we packed up our camp and headed back down the Icefields Parkway to the intersection of Canada's Rt. 1, then headed west into Yoho National Park. Just before the town of Field, we made the sharp turn to the right and up the steep Yoho River Valley to the Takakkaw Falls trailhead. "Takakkaw" means "wonderful" in the Cree language, and this huge waterfall certainly is, tumbling 830 feet from a glacier down a nearly-sheer rock wall.

Takakkaw Falls

Read more... )

More photos, fewer words (at Flickr)
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2015-08-01 02:06 pm

Canada vacation: Icefields Parkway

Our original plan was to go to Yoho National Park directly after leaving Lake Louise, but we hadn't realized that our departure date from the Chateau was the Friday before Canada's August Long Weekend. (That's what they called it. I asked the concierge what was being celebrated, and she shrugged. "It's just the long weekend holiday! It's not for anything!") The fancy lodge in Yoho that we wanted to stay at was booked up, as were all the advance campsites. So we made a reservation for later that week, and decided to take our chances at the larger campgrounds in Banff NP along the Icefields Parkway.

Despite driving up before noon, we found no room at the campgrounds. Fortunately, the Canadian National Parks have fairly nice overflow campgrounds available; the one we went to, Silverhorn, was basically a big parking lot with picnic tables around the edges, but there were nice tent sites, a pretty creek, and the view was incredible.

Cocktail hour along Silverhorn Creek

Read more... )

Flickr album with these and more pictures

Next stop, Yoho!
ilanarama: a mountain (mountain)
2015-07-30 09:32 am

Canada vacation: Lake Louise

After a week of camping we were ready for a little luxury. Instead, we got a lot of luxury! Britt had made reservations at the four-star Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, right on the famous glacial lake. It's ridiculously expensive, but staying there, right on the lake, meant we wouldn't have to drive up the crowded access road or find parking, since we wanted to do several well-known hikes that begin at the lake.

Since even the cheapest room was pretty pricey, Britt had splashed out for "Concierge Level" service. We took the elevator straight up to check in at the 7th-floor lounge rather than waiting in line in the lobby. This lounge also had an amazing breakfast spread every morning, and a huge array of appetizers and an honor bar from 5-7pm (you could easily make a dinner out of it, which we did several nights), and our 8th-floor room had a dormer window seat looking out to the lake.

P1040059<P1040060

Read more... )

A lot more pictures, a lot fewer words in the Flickr album

(sorry this is taking so long to post! I hope to get going on this again!)
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2015-07-28 04:26 pm

Canada vacation: Kootenay National Park

We crossed the border on Saturday July 26th, and it was a bit of an ordeal. Well, not compared to the officials tromping through our boat and hinting for bribes in the Dominican Republic, and the long forms that need filling out in St. Vincent, but still, we were Americans going into Canada and we thought it would be trivial. Alas, the customs and immigration officer immediately directed us to park and get out of our van while it was searched. I guess he saw our Colorado license plate and figured we were either liberals and therefore had weed, or conservatives and therefore had guns - and both are illegal in Canada. (He did ask some leading questions about marijuana!)

But they let us into Canada, and so that evening we rolled into Kootenay National Park and got one of the few remaining campsites at the National Park's Redstreak Campground. It was less than ideal due to the extremely loud extended family that partied all night next to us, but had the advantage of being hiking distance to Radium Hot Springs, where we soaked and enjoyed.

The next morning we drove into the main entrance of the park, waving the annual pass we had bought at the campground. It's a real no-brainer - unlike US national parks, which charge $10-$20 per car good for the week, Canadian parks charge by the day and by the person, and if you are going to spend a week or more in the parks, it costs less to just buy an annual pass (for slightly more than $100 US), so we did. It also means you can just wave at your pass and drive through while other people wait in line!

Mostly just a lot of photos )

These and more photos with captions but no other text at Flickr
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2015-07-24 10:02 pm

Canada vacation: on the way to Canada

We headed out of town, finally, on Sunday afternoon July 19th. The fastest route north actually started with a westward leg toward Moab, Utah, so we made for the campsite at the Canyon Rims Recreation Area we'd been to on a previous trip to Utah, and enjoyed our first evening of vacation with some adult beverages and a beautiful sunset.
Canyonlands sunset

Then it was north through Utah and into Idaho. In Idaho Falls we talked to a tourist desk guy who recommended we take the slight detour on the scenic route to Mesa Falls, and we did, and it was fantastic. Two enormous waterfalls!

More photos and text! ) The next day, Saturday July 25th, we crossed into to Canada!
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (marathon)
2014-04-21 06:22 pm

Lakefront 10-Miler

A few months ago I received a notice of a conference to be held at the Argonne National Laboratories, near Chicago. The first thing I thought was, "Hmm, this might be useful and interesting." The second thing I thought was, "Hmm, I wonder if there's a race I could run there?"

IMG_20140418_150307

Indeed there was: the First Merit Bank Lakefront 10 Miler, a race put on by CARA (Chicago Area Runners Association). My online friend [blogspot.com profile] justrunjim belongs to CARA, and had run the race before and said it was a good one. I decided that it would be a fine way to update my very old (2009) 10-mile PR with a nearly-sea-level race, and made arrangements to stay after the conference with Jim (who'd be running it with me) and his wife (who'd be running a 5K instead).

I had a good time at the conference, getting in three nice runs around the Argonne campus and the lovely crushed-limestone path which encircles it, but my stomach did not handle the conference-catering food well, and I was also not feeling any faster at Chicago's elevation than I am at home. In addition, I had not managed to run as much as I had wanted in the five weeks since running the Canyonlands Half Marathon, averaging only 40mpw rather than the 55-60 I had hoped for. Still, it was a perfect day for me, cold, sunny, and a little breezy, and I thought a target of about 7:20 pace (the slow end of my original goal, also Jim's goal) would be reasonable.

Jim and I lined up fairly close to the front; our friend Scott, a Chicagoan who has several children living in Durango and who I'd met running there, was coming back from injury and placed himself a ways behind us. After too much speechifying and the National Anthem, we were off!

The course begins with a loop to the north on a closed section of road, then hits the bike path and goes south to loop around a small-boat harbor before heading back north again. Along the way it stays on the path except for one short section routed over a grassy knoll, which I think is just the race organizers' way of trying to get a little more elevation change in there than Chicago normally provides. The path was open to other users - walkers, runners, cyclists - and it astonished me to see just how many people were out there. I think I saw as many runners just out for their Saturday morning run as I did actually in the race, and there were nearly 1400 racers!

There was a timing clock at each mile mark, a very nice feature. The first mile seemed awfully long, though, both by comparison to my Garmin (which had beeped some time back) and in absolute terms, and I suspect it was not quite where it should have been. However, it was easy enough to check my own time at each clock, and my total Garmin distance of 10.08 was reasonable for typical Garmin error/tangent issues.

I lost Jim pretty quickly, then caught him again at the grassy knoll around mile 2.7 - then lost him again as my stomach started to complain and my pace slowed. As I approached mile marker 4 I was thinking I might have to duck into a porta-potty, but I held it together and eventually the sensation passed and I felt good enough to accelerate again. I spotted Jim again around mile 7 - he was wearing a black shirt with a distinctive greeny-yellow neon hourglass shape on the back - but although I closed the distance bit by bit, I never could quite catch him. I crossed the line exactly 20 seconds behind him, in 1:12:59 - a 7:18 average pace (7:14 by Garmin) and good enough for 2nd in my age group.

(Also, a woman fell almost directly in front of me about a mile in. The guy who was directly in front of me stopped to help her up, and I zigged around them - but this is the second time in three races someone has fallen right in my path!)

Splits (note that I didn't stop my Garmin immediately; and the HR for the first 3 miles is artificial and should be ignored):
Dist	Pace	Elev chg   Avg HR      	Max HR          Elapsed
1.00	7:20	  -11	  157 (83%)	165 (90%)	0:07:19.69   
2.00	7:14	  +7	  166 (91%)	166 (91%)	0:14:33.68   
3.00	7:12	  +1	  166 (91%)	167 (92%)	0:21:45.57   
4.00	7:22	  +3	  152 (79%)	161 (86%)	0:29:07.29   
5.00	7:17	  -20	  152 (79%)	159 (84%)	0:36:24.72   
6.00	7:09	  +12	  162 (87%)	166 (90%)	0:43:33.64   
7.00	7:14	  -7	  165 (90%)	167 (92%)	0:50:47.71   
8.00	7:07	  +1	  165 (90%)	166 (91%)	0:57:55.18   
9.00	7:12	  +14	  165 (90%)	168 (92%)	1:05:07.49   
10.00	7:07	  -2	  166 (90%)	168 (92%)	1:12:14.00   
10.12	6:52	  -1	  168 (92%)	169 (93%)	1:13:05.26  

I put in a few fields I don't normally post, just to point out that 1) HAHA those elevation numbers! They are NEVER that small around here! and 2) you can see where I wasn't feeling so hot, the slowest miles other than the crowded first. Also my heart rate is interesting because it got right up there to what is basically my 10K HR - yet I didn't feel as though I was (aerobically) particularly working hard. My legs, on the other hand, could simply not go any faster. I was entirely limited by my legs, not my lungs.

This makes me wonder about how I can overcome the limitation of not being able to train my legs to the same level as my lungs, running at altitude. I mean, I can't maintain these 7:07-7:14 paces for longer than a mile at a time, at home; yet here I was, reeling them off if not with ease, at least without too much trouble. Maybe I need to run lots of mile repeats (and half-miles), and run downhill repeats, to get my legs used to rapid turnover.

Anyway, it was a good race (other than the gut issues early), and I'm very pleased with my final stats: 1:12:59, 2/61 AG, 24/742 women, 129/1351 OA. Here's a photo Jim took of the awards ceremony; the woman to my left (on the right) ran 1:06:10, which is like a 6:38 pace - I can't imagine!

lakefront awards
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2014-04-13 10:27 am
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rocking the Needles: Canyonlands trip Apr 5-8

Chesler Park camp area

As you may remember, in mid-March I ran the Canyonlands Half Marathon in Moab, Utah, and Britt came out as well and ran the associated 5-miler. We'd arranged to keep our hotel room for the night after the race, and on Sunday we headed home by way of the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, along with my online friend Mike from Reno, who'd also run, and his wife Dorothy. Britt was the only of us who'd been to this part of Canyonlands before, and that a long time ago; after a too-short hike into the Chesler Park area, we all agreed that it was worth a much longer visit.

So as soon as I got home, I got online and applied for a backpacking permit. Pretty much all spring dates were full up, but I snagged the only consecutive days at one of the Chesler Park campsites (backcountry camping is by permit only at assigned sites), Sunday and Monday April 6th and 7th. Our plan was to head out at midday Saturday in our Sportsmobile, camp on public land nearby, then hike in on Sunday morning. Our assigned campsite would be only a bit more than four miles in, so we would have time for a dayhike that afternoon and a longer one on Monday before hiking out on Tuesday morning. To our delight, our friend (and frequent backpacking companion, most recently on last summer's Weminuche Wilderness trip) Shan would come with us, though alas his wife, also a fun person to have along on a hike, was out of town.

Read more, and look at way too many photos... )

These and more photos (57 pictures plus a video which...sometimes works?) at Flickr
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2014-01-02 03:05 pm

the drive back from CIM

(Look! A post that's not about running!)

Britt had driven our Sportsmobile camper van out to Bakersfield CA just after Thanksgiving, to do some work on a solar project his company has out there, so our plan after CIM was to road-trip home over the next week and a half. As it happened, both of us came down with bad colds in Death Valley, so we high-tailed it directly home from there after only a half-day of exploring. But we had a lovely micro-vacation up until then!

Lots of photos, some text )

Zabriskie Point view
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2013-08-05 04:45 pm
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Index to UK trip

I've finally (finally!)posted all the photos and stories from our May/June trip to the UK. Briefly: we flew into Edinburgh and spent some time there with a friend, took the train to Newcastle to visit another friend, then took the train across to Carlisle to join a Sierra Club trip for a two-week walk across England on the 'best parts' of the Coast to Coast route from St. Bees on the Irish Sea to Robin Hood's Bay on the North Sea. Then we spent a couple of hours in York before returning to Edinburgh, and then home.

Edinburgh
Newcastle, Durham, and Wallsend
Carlisle, Birdoswald, and St. Bees
St. Bees to Cleator
Ennerdale Water to Honister Quarry
Stonethwaite to Grasmere
Grasmere to Glenridding
Across Ullswater to Pooley Bridge, and back to Glenridding
Aira Force loop
Sunbiggin Tarn to Kirkby Stephen
Kirkby Stephen to Keld
Keld to Gunnerside
Richmond
Swainby to Clay Bank Top
Clay Bank Top to Blakey
Whitby
Whitby to Robin Hood's Bay
York, back to Edinburgh, and back home to Colorado

The photos are all in a collection on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/svwindom/collections/72157634219094073/
ilanarama: me, The Other Half, Moab UT 2009 (Default)
2013-06-19 03:01 pm
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I'm back!

I'm back at home! And buried under work and laundry. But once I am un-buried, I'm going to slowly start posting My Illustrated Summer Adventures In Edinburgh and England (aie, more than 400 photos to sort through). I think what I'll do is backdate each post to the proper day of our vacation, and then, when it's done, post an index to the whole thing. So if you'd like to take small bites, you can track my 'uk' tag (or maybe the posts will show on your reading page, I dunno; I will try not checking the box that says 'don't show' - any preferences? ETA: it won't let me do this, so you'll have to track the tag or check my journal occasionally) but if you want the whole enchilada giant Yorkshire pudding filled with beef stew, you can wait until it's all up.
ilanarama: me in Escalante (yatta!)
2013-06-16 04:35 pm
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UK trip part 17: York, back to Edinburgh, and back home to Colorado

After spending a second night in Whitby, we boarded the bus for York; the York train station was the official end of the Sierra Club trip, and most of us were leaving that afternoon for Edinburgh or London or other destinations. The 'left luggage' office had an unbelievably slow line, since due to anti-terrorism measures every bag to be left there had to be opened and inspected, but Kris got the bright idea of checking with the hotel next door to the station, and sure enough, one of the porters was happy to let us leave our things there for a couple of pounds each. Thus unburdened, we were free to sight-see for a few hours.

York is an old walled city dating to Roman times (when it was the military fort Eboracum), and they have reconstructed enough of the wall - mostly medieval-era but with a few Roman bits left - to make a walking path around its circumference. Naturally, having walked (mostly) across England, we (me and Britt and Kris) were ready to WALK MORE!

On the city wall On the city wall

More pictures, mostly )

It was an awesome vacation, A+ would walk across England again! In conclusion:

Yay!  (On top of St. Sunday Crag)
ilanarama: me in Escalante (yatta!)
2013-06-15 11:53 am
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UK trip part 16: Whitby to Robin Hood's Bay

The 'official' Coast-to-Coast route continues across the moors to a place called Hawsker, where it picks up a footpath leading to the coast at a point about halfway between Whitby and Robin Hood's Bay. Most of the our group chose to take the bus to Hawsker and walk from there, for a five-mile finish to the two weeks of hiking. But the Cleveland Way - a trail system we'd followed for much of our time in the North York Moors - actually goes through Whitby and follows the coast all the way down, and Britt, Kris, and I opted to leave from the hotel and take this route to our destination.

We walked down to the river, crossed the bridge, and climbed the stairs leading to Whitby Abbey. Just past the ruins we easily found the marked footpath, which took us to the cliff's edge.

setting out

The path wound precariously along the top of the cliff. In many places the path veered dangerously close to the edge - or rather, the edge had eroded dangerously close to the path. Farther along the route we talked with another walker, a teacher who'd lived in the area for twenty years, and he told us that they'd had to relocate the path as the cliff fell into the sea.

eroded path

To the ends of the earth! )
ilanarama: my footies in my finnies (snorkeling)
2013-06-15 07:57 am
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UK trip part 15: Whitby

From the Lion Inn (at the end of the last update we took the bus to Whitby. We'd spend two nights here at the Saxonville Hotel, a small family-owned hotel in the West Cliff area.

We had a couple of hours to walk around before what turned out to be a very delicious dinner (I had a lemon ginger squid starter followed by a a sea trout and watercress tart) at the justifiably famous seafood restaurant Magpie's Cafe. The next day we walked to Robin Hood's Bay, the actual end of the C2C, and then took the bus back to Whitby to tour the dramatic Whitby Abbey ruins. I've decided to put the Whitby (town and abbey) pictures in this post, and the walk to Robin Hood's Bay in the next, just to break things up logically. I promise amazing photos in both sets!

Whitby

Warning: scenery overload )

Whitby at dusk

Even more Whitby and Robin Hood's Bay photos on Flickr
ilanarama: profile of me backpacking.  Woo. (hiking)
2013-06-14 04:53 pm
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UK trip part 15: Clay Bank Top to Blakey

We started this day's hike by getting lost. We had walked up the obvious dirt road, but the actual trail had started at an overgrown gate in the stone wall along the road, and we ended up having to backtrack over a mile to get on the proper trail. According to the guidebook, though, this was nothing new: in 1711, the justices of Yorkshire decreed that guideposts should be erected on the moors to aid travelers.

guidepost

More moors )

Photos at Flickr